Seoul: Small quake in North Korea likely due to mining blast

SEOUL, South Korea — A small earthquake in North Korea was likely caused by a mining operation, Seoul's weather agency said Friday.

An official from the Korean Meteorological Administration said a magnitude 2.1 earthquake was detected in North Korea on Thursday at a region near the border with the South.

The official says the quake was man-made and likely caused by an intentional blast in a coal mine.

"Our map data shows the locations of mines across North Korea, and we also detected soundwaves, proving that this quake was caused by an explosion," he said. He didn't want to be named, citing office rules.

The area is distant from the northeastern region where the North tested six nuclear devices until 2017. The North last year unilaterally demolished tunnels at its nuclear testing ground as it initiated diplomacy with Washington and Seoul.

North Korea's weakest nuclear test, its first one, conducted in 2006, generated a magnitude 4.3 quake. The U.S. Geological Survey measured the North's sixth and most powerful nuclear test in September 2017 at magnitude 6.3. The North then claimed it detonated a thermonuclear weapon built for its long-range missiles targeting the U.S. mainland.

Other News

Australia blames 'state actor' for hacking political parties

Feb 18, 2019

Australia's prime minister says a "sophisticated state actor" is behind a cyberattack on Parliament's computing network that affected the networks used by major political parties

New Zealand official calls Facebook 'morally bankrupt'

Apr 8, 2019

New Zealand's privacy commissioner has described Facebook as "morally bankrupt" and suggested his country follow Australia by making laws that could jail executives over streamed violence such as the Christchurch shootings.

Australia political leaders use Chinese app to chase votes

Apr 24, 2019

Australia's prime minister and his political rival say they are not tailoring their political messages to suit Chinese censors as the politicians increasingly use Chinese social media to woo Chinese-speaking voters.

Scienfinite is created to inspire our readers with the aim to understand the world and appreciate its everyday awe. Keep up with the technology and latest innovations here, only in Scienfinite.